Uniform Reporting Law Enforcement Improvement Act: A New Method to Improve Policing and Prevent Brutality

 

“Strip Law Enforcement of Unbridled Power”

With policing in our country spiraling out of control, radical changes are needed at the local, state and federal levels to improve the nation’s policing culture. The Uniform Reporting Law Enforcement Improvement Act (URLEIA) might be the radical change we need.

An important aspect of URLEIA is the introduction of a concept known as “smart policing.” Smart policing requires law enforcement agents to carryout policing functions with a focus on the obligation to preserve life and prevent injury. As such, law enforcement agents are expected to verify that an “actual threat” exists before using lethal force, even if it requires the officer to retreat or wait for backup. The act also increases the number of people who can investigate police wrongdoing by deputizing licensed attorneys throughout the United States to act on behalf of DOJ and bring criminal actions against police officers who violate citizens’ rights. The legislation offers a host of other important benefits: It holds law enforcement agents responsible for their misdeeds or reckless acts that can precipitate events that lead to a person’s death or injury; prohibits high-speed chases except in extraordinary circumstances; and introduces other changes designed to end the dysfunctional policing.

URLEIA also gives rise to a Pattern or Practice (POP) data bank that will track the individual actions of every law enforcement agent and private-duty security officer in the United States. In addition to allowing for the early detection of problematic officers and security guards, POP will provide detailed metrics and statistics about policing, including the number of people killed, demographic information about subjects of police actions and other important information needed to ensure transparency. The POP data bank also contains an unfit indicator that will prevent red-flagged police officers and security guards from continuing to work in law enforcement.

The act also introduces other important, but perhaps less obvious, protections, one of those being limiting the number of hours police officers can work on a given day in order to ensure officers are poised to exercise good judgement while interfacing with members of the public.

More manifestly obvious, however, it prevents local and state political bodies from using military equipment without first obtaining approval from the U.S. Department of Justice. It also includes whistleblower protection for law enforcement agents and requires law enforcement agents to disclose wrongdoings carried out by fellow officers. URLEIA also subjects officers to periodic drug and alcohol testing, particularly after a use-of-force event.

Equally important, URLEIA hands over the entire investigative process for an officer-involved use-of-force event to an independent investigative team selected by a member of the victim’s family. Law enforcement agents indicted for their acts will be prosecuted by a private prosecutor, also selected by the victim’s family. Furthermore, URLEIA provides for strong whistleblower protection that holds officers criminally liable for failing to disclose known wrongdoing by unscrupulous cops traditionally insulated from extensive legal ramifications for their actions by the collective “blue wall” of police silence and solidarity. Without question, URLEIA is the most sweeping legislative proposal developed to date to curtail out-of-control policing. Members of the public are encouraged to visit www.changeisonus.org to learn more about URLEIA. 

Are you, are you,

Coming to the streets,

Where they shot up a man,

Surrendered on his knees,

Strange things did happen here,

No stranger would it be,

If we close our doors,

Pretend we do not see.

 

Are you, are you,

Coming to the streets,

Where dead men call out,

It’s justice that we need,

Strange things did happen here,

No stranger would it be,

If we close our doors,

Pretend we do not see.

 

Are you, are you

Coming to the streets,

To lift up your voice,

So we can be free,

Strange things did happen here,

No stranger would it be,

If we close our hearts,

Pretend we do not see.

 Are you, are you,

Coming to the streets,

An agent of change,

Locked hand-in-hand with me,

Strange things did happen here,

No stranger would it be,

If we close our doors,

Pretend we do not see.

-Pretend We Do Not See

Variation on The Hanging Tree by Suzanne Collin. Lyrics revised by Jerroll Sanders. Vocalist is Kimberly Baker.

 
Will Gaines